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Registered: 07/12/11
Posts: 18
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CALL 314-397-7278. LOCATED NEAR THE AIRPORT NEAR 1-170 AND ST. CHARLES ROCK ROAD.

I believe this is Model GS 5020.

This is a gas powered reciprocating saw in non-running condition. It appears to be complete, other than the pull rope. I have not tried to turn the motor over, but I am sure it is probably seized. These are unique, and perfect for someone who is into vintage and antique tools. From the research I've done, the ones that are still in use are loved by landscapers and ice fishermen. The reciprocating blade provides a cleaner, straighter, cut for the landscapers with half the mess. The movement of the blade is perfect for people to ice fish, by not having the ice cold water and ice shavings cover you as you are making your hole in the ice. I can't tell you alot about this, but I have pasted some info and testimonials I found on different blogs. I can't verify what is fact, and what is opinion:

1. One thing to note about the Wright Saw was that they achieve the reciprocating motion without any kind of gear box. They have a rod extending off the top of the piston that slides through a sealed slip bearing and the moving part of the saw blade is actually going at the same speed as the piston. The crankshaft on these engines does no real work.
2. Wright may have built a saw like you say, but all the Wright saws that I have owned over the years have had the blade opposite the piston. It still operated at the same frequency as the piston strokes, but from the crankshaft in this instance.
3. I have owned several Wright Reciprocaters over the years. Wright's also use a charging piston that is oversize to the working piston - acts like a supercharger, in that more air and fuel is shoved into the cylender than can be normally asperated. John was right in that sense - the saw blade was driven off the top of the supercharging piston. Landscapers loved the Wrights, they made straight cuts and lost 1/2 the material cut by a standard chain saw.
4. I had a Wright saw a long time ago.On this model I could not get it to start.
I found out due to the direct drive set-up,the trigger throttle control
incorporated a kill switch for safety.In order to clear the ignition ground I had to pull the trigger to a first click point,then I was able to start it.If you took your finger off the trigger completely after reving it up ,it would ground the ignition and stop.Guys cutting bridge timbers and rail road ties loved the Wright for its nice even cut and narrow kerf.
5. Here are some pictures of my Wrightsaw. It is a Model GS 2016. The first 2 pictures show the blade operating rod as it extends through the top of the cylinder. #1 is at top of stroke and #2 is at bottom of stroke. #3 & 4 show the complete saw from both sides. There is no secondary 'charging' piston on this engine, just the main running piston with a rod coming off the top and through the sleeve. The sparkplug enters through the side of the cylinder.
6. Your wright appears different than the one I had, mine were 1 gold metallic, and the other,copper colored, and had a lower profile.
7. Here is a copper colored one that Mr. Mendoza was refering to in his post. It apparently has a different blade drive since the cylinder is pointed the opposite direction. This is a Model GS 5020
8. I got a wright "super rebel " reciprocating saw but my blade is broken also mine has a power products model AH-47 2 cycle engine with tillotson HL carb i rebuilt the carb and it runs like new mine was made in 1958.
9. Wright made teeth blades for hardwood, softwood, meat-cutting and "all purpose" use.



CALL 314-397-7278. LOCATED NEAR THE AIRPORT NEAR 1-170 AND ST. CHARLES ROCK ROAD.

I believe this is Model GS 5020.

This is a gas powered reciprocating saw in non-running condition. It appears to be complete, other than the pull rope. I have not tried to turn the motor over, but I am sure it is probably seized. These are unique, and perfect for someone who is into vintage and antique tools. From the research I've done, the ones that are still in use are loved by landscapers and ice fishermen. The reciprocating blade provides a cleaner, straighter, cut for the landscapers with half the mess. The movement of the blade is perfect for people to ice fish, by not having the ice cold water and ice shavings cover you as you are making your hole in the ice. I can't tell you alot about this, but I have pasted some info and testimonials I found on different blogs. I can't verify what is fact, and what is opinion:

1. One thing to note about the Wright Saw was that they achieve the reciprocating motion without any kind of gear box. They have a rod extending off the top of the piston that slides through a sealed slip bearing and the moving part of the saw blade is actually going at the same speed as the piston. The crankshaft on these engines does no real work.
2. Wright may have built a saw like you say, but all the Wright saws that I have owned over the years have had the blade opposite the piston. It still operated at the same frequency as the piston strokes, but from the crankshaft in this instance.
3. I have owned several Wright Reciprocaters over the years. Wright's also use a charging piston that is oversize to the working piston - acts like a supercharger, in that more air and fuel is shoved into the cylender than can be normally asperated. John was right in that sense - the saw blade was driven off the top of the supercharging piston. Landscapers loved the Wrights, they made straight cuts and lost 1/2 the material cut by a standard chain saw.
4. I had a Wright saw a long time ago.On this model I could not get it to start.
I found out due to the direct drive set-up,the trigger throttle control
incorporated a kill switch for safety.In order to clear the ignition ground I had to pull the trigger to a first click point,then I was able to start it.If you took your finger off the trigger completely after reving it up ,it would ground the ignition and stop.Guys cutting bridge timbers and rail road ties loved the Wright for its nice even cut and narrow kerf.
5. Here are some pictures of my Wrightsaw. It is a Model GS 2016. The first 2 pictures show the blade operating rod as it extends through the top of the cylinder. #1 is at top of stroke and #2 is at bottom of stroke. #3 & 4 show the complete saw from both sides. There is no secondary 'charging' piston on this engine, just the main running piston with a rod coming off the top and through the sleeve. The sparkplug enters through the side of the cylinder.
6. Your wright appears different than the one I had, mine were 1 gold metallic, and the other,copper colored, and had a lower profile.
7. Here is a copper colored one that Mr. Mendoza was refering to in his post. It apparently has a different blade drive since the cylinder is pointed the opposite direction. This is a Model GS 5020
8. I got a wright "super rebel " reciprocating saw but my blade is broken also mine has a power products model AH-47 2 cycle engine with tillotson HL carb i rebuilt the carb and it runs like new mine was made in 1958.
9. Wright made teeth blades for hardwood, softwood, meat-cutting and "all purpose" use.





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